SophytoPro Skin Restore System

SophytoPro Skin Restore System
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311001
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615033003111
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SophytoPro Skin Restore System

A luscious blend of multitasking organic fruit extracts that help purify, treat and naturally supplement impure and age-related skin conditions. Suitable for sensitive skin types, this breakthrough system is enhanced with age-defying botanicals that help control breakouts, while reducing the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, to attain a more radiant, healthier looking complexion.

Pure Cleanser

Cleansing technology packed with moisturizing benefits that effectively and gently remove surface grime and makeup.
 
Pure Daily System
Care for your skin 24/7 with these 3 high-performance every day essentials that work together to create the ultimate age-defying cleansing, balancing and nourishing skincare regimen.

 

Skin Purifying Cleanser
This lightweight gel cleanser is designed to maintain skin’s pH balance, while effectively removing surface debris and impurities, leaving skin feeling comfortable and refreshed.

SophytoPro Skin Restore System

Three step skin care kit
 
Step 1
Skin Purifying Cleanser 3.381 fl oz 
 
- 92% organic
- Gluten Free
- Cruelty Free
 
Designed to maintain skin’s pH balance while effectively removing surface debris and impurities, leaving skin feeling comfortable and refreshed.
 
Step 2
Skin Restoring Acne Serum 1.014 fl oz
salicylic acid acne treatment
 
- 76% organic
- Gluten Free
- Cruelty Free
 
An oil-free serum containing anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory action that purifies the skin and promotes the elimination of dead cells. Specially designed to mitigate p.acnes proliferation to prevent future breakouts.
 
Active Ingredient
Salicylic Acid 1.0%...........Acne Treatment
Uses: For the management of acne.
 
When using this product- Skin irritation and dryness are more likely to occur if you use another topical acne medication at the same time. If irritation occurs, only use one topical acne medication at a time.
 
Step 3
Skin Reviving Moisturizer 1.014 fl oz
 
- 85% organic
- Gluten Free
- Cruelty Free
A lightweight, luxurious moisturizer that assists dry skin conditions, while helping to control excess oil production
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Product rating

Reviews

  • Author: Chynna
    OMG! these cute bottles are insane, I love them to pieces. The toner has the best spritzer which I love using. I can see why Chelsea's guests love these, they are truly adorable and the products are amazing x

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONSVersion 1 / April 2014 ______________________________________________________________________________

IS SALICYLIC ACID SAFE FOR PREGNANT WOMEN TO USE?

There are no studies specifically looking at topical salicylic acid in pregnancy. Topical salicylic acid is common in many over-the-counter dermatological agents, and the lack of adverse reports suggests a low teratogenic potential.1 Despite these findings, it would be best to recommend the Pure Daily System. They should still see some improvements in complexion/impure skin even without the salicylic acid.

Source; (1) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3114665/; Safety of Skincare products during pregnancy; Salicylic Acid, (page 3 of 10). Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel Safety assessment of salicylic acid, butyloctyl salicylate, calcium salicylate, C12-15 alkyl salicylate, capryloyl salicylic acid, hexyldodecyl salicylate, isocetyl salicylate, isodecyl salicylate, magnesium salicylate, MEA-salicylate, ethylhexyl salicylate, potassium salicylate, methyl salicylate, myristyl salicylate, sodium salicylate, TEA-salicylate, and tridecyl salicylate. Int J Toxicol. 2003;22(Suppl 3):1–108.[PubMed. James AH, Brancazio LR, Price T. Aspirin and reproductive

outcomes. Obstet Gynecol Surv. 2008;63(1):49–57. [PubMed] WHY DOES THE SKIN DEEP DATABASE SHOW SOME INGREDIENTS WITH A HIGH RATING?

EWG does the best they can to give the consumer all known information regarding the safety of individual ingredients and we applaud their work! We are a partner with the group, compliant with their Campaign for Safe Cosmetics Compact (we were one of their first compact signers) and are in full support of their endeavors to educate consumers seeking to find the safest products possible. With that said, there are four factors that may give consumers an inconsistent or a confusing presentation of this safety substantiation data:

The Data Gap: After each ingredient there is a circle with a percentage shown. This is the data gap. This shows that there is X amount of data unknown about said ingredient to substantiate safety. If the data gap is 81%, that means that only 19% of the research actually exists to give the ingredient a safety rating.

The individual ingredient rating shows only the conventional form of the raw ingredient and does not take into consideration the myriad of sources (and quality levels) an ingredient may come from, such as, organic versus conventional. Many times, potential pesticide residue will raise the individual ingredient's rating. Being that we use mostly organic ingredients, this single conventional rating shows that our organic ingredients may contain pesticide, herbicide or fungicide residue that is not actually present. We have discussed this issue with EWG's lead scientist and have been assured that EWG is seeking to fix these inconsistencies within their own rating system.

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WHERE DOES THE NAME SOPHYTO COME FROM?

The word PHTYO comes from phototherapy; our research using botanicals versus chemicals. We asked a focus group to provide one word that described their experience with the products. SO effective, SO clean, SO transparent were the most popular used, so we fused SO with PHYTO and there you have SOPHYTO. PRO indicates this is a PROFESSIONAL line exclusively designed for Ortho Molecular Products, Inc for distribution through medical practitioners only.

WHY DO WE USE A NATURAL FRAGRANCE IN BOTH MOISTURIZERS?

Sophisticated texture and fragrance is part of a formulation’s aesthetics and are important to the discerning consumer. The fragrances in both moisturizers are 100% natural and contain essential oils. These aromas are only added to the moisturizers because they contain organic, cold pressed oils which can impart an earthy aroma. It is important to recognize the value consumers attach to the texture and fragrance of their skin care products. The pleasure associated with applying skin care encourages compliance. For this reason, we have included a unique custom-made natural fragrance using essential oils so the sensorial experience is a more positive one. An ingredient list of the essential oils is available upon request.

WHAT HAPPENS IF A PATIENT CANNOT USE ESSENTIAL OILS OF THEIR FACE?

Step 1 in the Pure Daily System (Pure Cleanser) is actually 100% moisturizer, so if they cannot use a facial product that contains EO’s, then they can use Step 1 as a facial moisturizer also and leave Step 3 (Pure Moisturizer) as a body moisturizer.

WHAT IS CITRONELLOL?

Citronellol is a constituent of neroli essential oil used in the Skin Reviving Moisturizer. As a European company, we are adhering to the European Union’s strict cosmetic guidelines by listing these 'potential' allergens. These constituents are present in minuscule amounts, and remain well within the EU’s acceptable limits. But listing them is helpful for anyone who has these particular sensitivities. Linalool and limonene are also constituents of essential oils and are at the end of the ingredient list of both moisturizers, again, they are highlighted so any individual can identify if they need to avoid these components from pure, natural essential oils.

WHY DO WE NOT CATER TO DIFFERENT SKIN TYPES?

Skin type assessment is based on the consumer’s subjective view of dryness or oiliness; however, discrepancies are often found between this subjective view and objective measurements. Within the scientific community, no clear consensus regarding skin type exists, 1 whereas among beauty professionals, the primary classification of skin types would be the traditional dry, oily, combination and sensitive.

Source: (1) SW Youn, SJ Kim, IA Hwang and KC Park, Evaluation of facial skin type by sebum secretion: discrepancies between subjective description and sebum secretion, Skin Res Technol 8 168–172 (2002)

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WHAT ARE THE NON-BOTANICAL INGREDIENTS?

In cosmetics, molecule penetration is limited to the epidermis and, to some extent, to the dermis. Skin care preparations include emulsions (hydrous creams and lotions), pastes and jellies, anhydrous cream and lotion, ointments, hydro/alcoholic solution or gel, sprays and sticks. Among these, emulsions (oil in water and water in oil) have generally been the most desirable vehicles for the delivery of cosmetic actives to the desired site. An emulsion is perceived to be emollient, with moisturizing benefits, and can include UV-filtering effects, vitamins, antioxidants, plant-derived proteins or amino acids/peptides, plant- derived flavonoids, AHAs and other skin beneficial agents. The selection of a well-balanced emulsifier system is also essential for effective delivery of emollients and humectants. Mixtures of emulsifiers must be selected intelligently to maximize the benefits of the rest of the formulation.

All ingredients below are from non-GMO, vegetable source:

1.Cetearyl Alcohol - used as a viscosity modifier and does have some emulsifier properties. It is derived from coconut oil.

2.Cetyl Alcohol – used as a co-emulsifier and is derived from coconut oil. 3.Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate - used as an emulsifier and is derived from organic potatoes. 4.Glyceryl Stearate - used to help stabilize products and decrease water-evaporation and is

vegetable derived. 5.Sucrose Stearate – used as an emulsifying and skin conditioning agent. It is derived from sugar,

which is combined with stearic acid from coconut. 6.Sucrose Tristearate – used as an emulsifying and skin conditioning agent and is derived from

sugar, which is combined with stearic acid from coconut. 7.Isoamyl Laurate – used to improve the spreadability of formulations and is from the esterification

of lauric acid (from vegetable oils) and isoamyl alcohol (from fermentation). 8.See below for the remaining ingredient.

WHAT DO WE USE FOR PRESERVATIVES?

Strict rules govern the inclusion of preservatives in cosmetics. Throughout Europe, manufacturers must choose from only those preservatives listed in the EU Cosmetics Directive. These have been subjected to scientific tests and approval procedures before they are permitted for use as cosmetic ingredients. The EU Cosmetics Directive (76/768/EEC) protects consumers and makes sure that all cosmetic products on the European market are safe. It requires cosmetics to cause no damage to human health when applied under normal or reasonably foreseeable conditions of use.

Organic acids – considered to be the “natural alternatives” for use in more natural-based cosmetics which are considered suitable for delicate and sensitive skin types.

1.Sodium Benzoate 2.Potassium Sorbate 3.Levulinic Acid 4.Sodium Levulinic 5.Benzyl alcohol 6.Sodium Hydroxide – pH adjuster

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WHAT ARE EU COSMETICS DIRECTIVE STANDARDS?

The Cosmetics Directive 76/768/EEC was published on July 27, 1976. It allows cosmetic products in the European Economic Area to circulate freely and ensures their safety for use. A cosmetic product is any substance “intended to make contact with external parts of the human body, or inside the mouth, with the intention of cleaning or perfuming them, changing their appearance, correcting odors, protecting them or maintaining their good condition”.

Compare U.S. legislation with European law. The U.S. Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act define cosmetics as products for “cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance.” The intentionally vague language gives manufacturers a lot of freedom to produce questionable merchandise without the risk of government interference.

Cosmetics Directive sets out certain standards cosmetic products must meet before they can be placed in the European Economic Area, such as substances that cannot be included in the formula of the products, requirements for labeling and packaging, rules for market surveillance and notification to the competent authority of each member state and laws relating to animal testing. Since it was introduced, the Cosmetics Directive has been amended by the European Parliament and the European Council 55 times in order to keep up with the changing market for cosmetics. The Directive puts a ban on testing finished cosmetic products on animals, and bans marketing products that have been tested on animals

U.S. law can’t prevent other countries from importing prohibited cosmetics. Mercury, used mostly in skin bleaching or whitening products, used to be a preservative in shampoos, bubble bath, hair color and deodorants, etc. As it’s absorbed through the skin, mercury causes brain, kidney, and lung damage. But cosmetics containing mercury are often smuggled into the U.S. from China or India. After a case of mercury poisoning from an illegally imported skin-whitening cream occurred, the FDA warned against using such products but was unable to take any further legal action.

While the EU has more protective and stringent laws toward cosmetics than the U.S. does, it also has the advantage of having each member state regulate products within its own national borders. Where we have one regulatory body, Europe has twenty-seven independent (but cooperative) organizations.

The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR), a self-policing safety panel, is the FDA’s main source of scientific data. According to its Web site, the CIR “thoroughly reviews and assesses the safety of ingredients used in cosmetics in an open, unbiased, and expert manner, and publishes the results in the peer-reviewed scientific literature.”

But despite its claims of “fair and balanced” results, the CIR is funded by the Personal Care Products Council (PCPC), an industry group of more than six hundred cosmetic companies. In fact, the PCPC reportedly spent over $600,000 on lobbyists in Sacramento to prevent the California Safe Cosmetics Act of 2005, a law that would have required manufacturers to post any unsafe ingredients on product labels, from passing.

Reports from environmental and public-health groups, like the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, have often directly contradicted the “safe” findings of the CIR. In a 2007 study, the Environmental Working Group found that:

WHO TESTS FOR UNSAFE ADDITIVES IN BEAUTY PRODUCTS IN THE US?

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One in thirty products sold in the U.S. fails to meet industry or government safety standards. Nearly four hundred products sold in the U.S., such as Crest Whitestrips and Neutrogena daily face cream, contain chemicals banned in Japan, Canada, and the EU. Ninety-eight percent of all products assessed contained one or more ingredients never tested for safety.

However, even with the CIR’s reports readily available, many cosmetic companies continue to create products that defy safety guidelines. Since the CIR has the authority only to “advice,” not to regulate, these products are still sold in stores all across America. U.S. companies often create safer products for their European market and sell the more dangerous versions in American stores.

Many companies acknowledge the danger of the chemicals in their products but insist that using the product as directed minimizes health risks. But before you lather, rinse and repeat, remember that trace chemical amounts accumulate over time in the human body, and the CIR’s tests don’t account for lifelong use. Your daily body wash might contain a small, permissible amount of phthalates, but over the course of several years, the amount of phthalates in your body can reach extremely unhealthy levels.

DECEMBER 12, 2013 - THE LATEST ON AMERICA’S POSITION

In an FDA Policy Forum, Egan and Fuerch provide a comparative analysis of the regulation of cosmetics in the United State and European Union. The authors highlight increasing safety concerns with cosmetics and describe how the E.U. has responded with stricter standards and more regulatory requirements than the U.S. FDA has the authority to implement. Despite recent efforts by Congress to pass legislation that would broaden FDA’s authority over cosmetics, Egan and Fuerch assert that there is no reason to expect Congressional action in the near future.

See the full press release on this link:

http://www.fdli.org/docs/press-releases/egan-and-fuerch-press-release.pdf?sfvrsn=0

Kim Egan has 15 years experience practicing regulatory law and litigation in some of the country's finest law firms. She started Saltbox Consulting to provide the highest level of advice at a fraction of the cost of large law firms. She appears on the Legal 500 list of Recommended Health Care and Life Sciences Lawyers, and has been listed in the International Who's Who of Life Sciences Lawyers and the International Who's Who of Business Lawyers since 2009.

Please take a moment to read Kim Egan’s blog post of the difference between American and Europe – this is without doubt very telling in her own words) of the concerns:

“My ancestors came to this country because we thought Europe had become corrupt, unlivable, stratified, constrained, close-minded, and downright unpleasant. For the next four hundred years, we boasted that our food supply was unlimited and nutritious, our consumer products were the best and the cheapest, and our visionaries like Teddy Roosevelt were un-paralleled environmental custodians. We were the most innovative, the most forward-looking, and the most ethical. We thought.

But has 21st Century Europe outpaced us? Recent regulatory developments suggest that perhaps it has:

The European Union bans over a thousand toxins and carcinogens from a wide variety of

consumer products. The EU prohibits approximately 1,200 substances from cosmetics. The

United States bans about a dozen. We don’t even ban lead – a known health hazard – in lipstick.

The European Union (along with many other jurisdictions) does not permit manufacturers to sell

food products that contain genetically-modified organisms (GMOs). The United States does not

even require manufacturers to label foods that contain GMOs.

The European Union does not permit manufacturers to test cosmetics on animals, or to use any

ingredient in a cosmetic that has been tested on animals. In the United States, we allow almost

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anything to be tested on animals, and we do not require manufacturers to tell consumers when they

do.

The European Union sets Maximum Residue Levels (MRLs) for thousands of pesticides used on

food producing crops. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issues an MRL for a pesticide

only if a manufacturer asks for one, and a manufacturer need not ask for an MRL before marketing

its pesticide. Not surprisingly, we have very few MRLs.

The European approach is that manufacturers must show that their products are safe before they sell

them in Europe.

The American approach is that you can sell pretty much anything you want (with some notable exceptions

such as pharmaceuticals, of course) and if your product turns out to be dangerous, the court system will

take care of it.

Which system do you want”?

Kim’s blog and this article is available in full on this link: http://saltboxlaw.com/author/kegan44/

CAN I REFER TO THIS AN ORGANIC LINE?

No, the USDA states that for a product to be called ‘organic’ it must contain a minimum of 95% organic ingredients. We use an average of 90% certified organic ingredients in our products, but we do not claim it to be ‘organic’.

WHAT INGREDIENTS IN SKINCARE CONTAIN GLUTEN?

As a general rule, the list below indicates ingredients that contain gluten. This list is not exhaustive, but it is a list of the most common ingredients found in skincare products;

Amp-Isostearoyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Barley Grass Barley Hordeum vulgare Disodium Wheatgermamido Peg-2 Sulfosuccinate Hordeum Vulgare Extract

Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Pg-Propyl Silanetriol Hydrolyzed Wheat Starch Hydroxypropyltrimonium Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Semolina Triticum Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Triticum aestivum

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Triticum carthlicum Triticum durum Triticum polonicum Triticum spelta Triticum turanicum Triticum turgidum Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Flour Lipids Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Extract Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil Wheat (Triticum Vulgare) Bran Extract Wheat amino acids

Wheat Bran Extract Wheat Germ Glycerides Wheat Protein Wheat Triticum Monococcum

WHAT IS THE SHELF LIFE OF THE PURE DAILY SYSTEM?

2 years unopened, but after opening it is recommended to be used within 12 months

WHAT IS THE SHELF LIFE OF THE SKIN RESTORE SYSTEM?

Step 1 and Step 3 are 2 years unopened, but after opening it is recommended to use within 12 months. Step 2 the Skin Restoring Acne Serum is 1 year unopened, but after opening it is recommended to use within 12 months.

WHY DON’T THE MOISTURIZERS OR SERUMS INCLUDE A SUNSCREEN?

We do not formulate our products to include SPF because the minerals that allow us to do so in an entirely chemical-free/synthetic-free way would lend an undesirable consistency and weight to our products. Plus, there are many questions surrounding the use of nanoparticles. Until we hear their use is 100% safe for human use and the environment, we elect not to include them in any of our formulas.

Nanoparticles are one-twentieth the thickness of a human hair. The nanoparticles used in sunscreens and other consumer products may have novel biological and physical properties, which can lead to unusual effects – both good and bad. Although nano-titanium and zinc sunscreens have been deemed safe by several regulatory bodies with respect to skin penetration, there are still concerns regarding the occupational and environmental hazards that nonmaterial’s may pose. Inhalation may be the most harmful route of nanoparticle exposure, and while this is a small concern for consumers of skin care products, it poses a significant risk for workers handling the product before it reaches store shelves.1 Several studies have shown that inhaled TiO2 particles induce a harmful inflammatory response in the lungs, 2 and these exposed workers may not be receiving adequate protection.3 TiO2 and ZnO particles may also impact the environment in several ways. Depending on manufacturing techniques, nanoparticles can be released into the air or water. Consumers may also contribute to water contamination, as residual nanoparticles run off their skin while bathing or swimming. Ultimately,

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nanoparticles could contaminate water, soil, and food products. The EPA has acknowledge these potential risks and is planning to conduct a comprehensive environmental assessment of the potential risks related to nano-titanium and nano-zinc.4

At this time, we are developing facial care products to include botanical sunscreen, but the research and development time frame on these products could be another year out due to our high standards of product purity and quality.

Source: (1)EWG. Skin Deep Cosmetic Safety Database: Nanotechnology - Summary. 2010. http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com/special/sunscreens/nanotech.php. (2) EPA. Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide (External Review Draft). In: EPA, ed. Washington, DC: EPA/600/R-09/057; 2009.(3) Chen H, , Su, SF., Chien, CT., Lin, WH., Yu, SL., Chou, CC., et al. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce emphysema-like lung injury in mice. Faseb J. 2006; 20(13):2393-2395. (4) Maynard A, Kuempel E. Airborne Nanostructured Particles and Occupational Health. Journal of Nanoparticle Research. 2005; 7(6):587-614. Borm PJ, Robbins D, Haubold S, et al. The potential risks of nonmaterial’s: a review carried out for ECETOC. Part Fibre Toxicol. 2006;3:11

WHAT IS THE PAGE NUMBER IN GRAIN BRAIN WHERE DR. PERLMUTTER ENDORSES SophytoPRO®?

The testimonial is located on page 237 where he states “SophytoPRO® is one such company that specializes in a skincare line free of ingredients that can not only irritate your skin, but body”.

WHAT OTHER BOOKS HAVE THE BRAND BEEN MENTIONED IN?

Blood Sugar Solution by Dr. Mark Hyman Spent by Dr. Frank Lipman

WHAT AWARDS HAVE THE BRAND WON?

The first generation of Pure Antioxidant Serum was featured in ELLE Magazine as Best Natural Anti Aging Antioxidant Serum – this was quite special because the panel of judges were Professors of Dermatology and Dermatologists. Vogue featured this same product in its Gold Blends section. We took 1st, 2nd and 3rd place at the coveted Best in British Innovation for Natural and Organic Products Awards 2012; this has never been done before in the history of this award, the products that received this award were Pure Cleanser, Pure Antioxidant Serum and a product currently not carried by Ortho Molecular Products, Inc. We have also won numerous online awards. A couple of slides are available as a marketing tool to show our past success.

WHO IS A HIGH RISK FROM CHEMICAL EXPOSURE FROM THEIR COSMETICS?

Those who are oblivious to the many chemicals in their personal care products – this, believe it or not, is alarmingly high in the US. This demographic have a challenging time transitioning from their high-end, premium lines to more natural products. Natural products for the most part lack sophisticated texture and fragrance, which is part of a formulation’s aesthetics and are important to the discerning consumer. This consumer is used to spending an average of $100 per month on their premium products. For this reason, we have included sophisticated textures and unique custom-made natural fragrances using essential oils so the sensorial experience is a more positive one.

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IF A DOCTOR IS CLEANING UP THEIR PATIENTS DIET AND SUPPLEMENTS, DOESN’T IT STAND TO REASON THEY SHOULD BE JUST AS INTERESTED IN THEIR PERSONAL CARE?

Yes, when you consider the average American consumer is potentially exposing themselves to appx 47,000 unique chemical ingredients each year, just from their personal care alone, this is definitely an area a Doctor also needs to clean up.

DOES SKINMEDICA® USE PARABENS?

Yes, they use a combination of methylparaben, propylparaben, butylparaben, isobutylparaben, and ethylparabens in the following formulas;

TNS Line Refine TNS Essential Serum TNS Lip Plump System TNS Illuminating Eye Cream TNS Ultimate Daily Moisturizer SPF 20 Sunscreen TNS Line Refine TNS Recovery Complex

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*Your results may vary.
Your results may vary from those listed above.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Since we do not know everything about your medical history and medications, please consult with your health care practitioner before implementing any new protocols and supplements. Do not construe any information listed on this site as a substitute for actual medical advice. The info you receive from us is not intended to replace medical advice by your doctor. Forrest Health, Inc. does not dispense medical advice, prescribe, or diagnose illness. We offer nutritional programs and supplements that support your health. The views and nutritional advice expressed by Forrest Health, Inc. are not intended to be a substitute for conventional medical service. If you have a medical condition, see your physician of choice